Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Inspiring Myself in 2016 With Website Comments

If you read my last blog post in 2015; Recap of 2015 I was a little negative on the value of the science project ideas on my website http://www.ideas-inspire.com. After updating the website with the latest comment, it made me feel like I could be making a difference in student lives, I started reading more comments that were similar. Granted I receive some that are nasty which are never published. Some are amusing like this one: " ** I love looking at these comments they give me love and support for my job as a cat lady. I love kissing hobos in the moonlight and eating rocks :)"


I thought I would share some of what I considered the better comments to the website:




Mousetrap Cars  http://ideas-inspire.com/mousetrap-cars/

This was a great help for me in science or I probably would of failed science!!! Very descriptive and easy to understand as well. Thank you!!!

very helpful got an A on my project and im in 7th grade

very good I got our mouse trap car idea from this website thanks mr miller these are great ideas

this is so awesome broski

this website is so helpful!

Soooooooo helpfullllll! Actually it really showed me what I could do for my own
l love it so much i mad 24 cars i love the experiences it is life changing


Mousetrap Car Construction article     http://ideas-inspire.com/mousetrap-car-construction-article-and-plan/




Those moments mean the most to my students and me, but they are not valued by a system that focuses on preparing workers rather than thinkers, collecting data rather than teaching and treating teachers as less than professionals.


Syringe Hydraulic Arm   http://ideas-inspire.com/syringe-hydraulic-arm/





This page was very informational. My Pre-engineering class doing a project similar to this. I found this page while doing research for it. We will be making robotic arms for a battle ball competition using a magnet and magnetic balls.

I love it! It is the coolest thing ever. I was trying to do another hydraulic arm and you inspired me! Well done!!!!!!!!!

Its an awesome idea. I am working on it … Thanks for such a great idea.

Just one word to say awesome
very good representation ,simple and understandable. thanks a lot…………….

fantastic,i like it,am also completing my project,I think on hydraulic fluid it would be better to use brake fluid rather than just water.keep it up


Basic Aerodynamics With a Lesson   http://ideas-inspire.com/basic-aerodynamics-with-lesson/




There’s a good balance between clarity and thoroughness here. I’m looking forward to the further development of this promising learning resource.

Hi Bill, When I taught after school model airplane activities, I could have used this tool as an introduction to gliding and rubber power. Nice work. Someone out there could use this as part of a science lesson plan on beginning aerodynamics.
Nice content and thorough treatment of all topics relating to rubber band powered planes. Keep up the good work!

Very good , the art work helps get the idea across about the control surfaces
and the formulas give the science and math principals for all of them !!





Thanks for the thorough guide. My brother’s physics class had a contest of the longest flying plane and there was one contestant with foam flying surfaces. His plane was a bit slower but flew more stable and floated longer than the others.

Excellent advice and inspiration for helping kids to get into planes. I started as a kid in the early ’70’s buying stick rubber powered balsa planes. I forget the make but they were very light with very efficient propellors, looking like the SIG you show here. The wings and tail were 1/32″ thick and clipped into a simple plastic fitting which slid back and forth on the 1/4″ x 1/8″ medium balsa fuselage for balancing. The duration was pretty good and I used to experiment with making different sized wings and rubber motors. I used castor oil for rubber lubricant. I remember warping the wings and tail using my hot breath to create aerofoil lifting shape for the wings and making the tail turn or lift / dive. Great memories which in the fullness of time took me into a career in science and engineering. Keep up the good work. Steve


Bill Kuhl




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